Tuesday, January 12, 2016

The Daily Brew on the Slopes: Oslo Coffee Company Thor House Blend

Last year, my parent and family friends bid on a ski weekend at a charity auction and won. As a result, we had our first annual trip to Okemo Mountain with our two families. It was really nice to get everyone together on the trip, away from technology and our busy lives in the city. The cabin has no TV or internet! When we weren't skiing or sleeping we were playing games by the fireplace and enjoying each other's company. This year, we kept up with the new tradition and rented the house again. 






Growing up Okemo was my family's favorite ski mountain on the North East. The mountain has terrain for all different ski levels, and they are great at making snow. I think back on skiing at Okemo as a kid and remember skiing in chains down the mountain with my family after ski school. We liked to ski as a group, follow the leader style. It was a lot of fun. To me one of the distinguishing things about Okemo is that it's large enough to not get bored skiing it over and over again. It has a lot of challenging downhill trails, and nice winding greens. 


Before I go on a too much of a tangent about Okemo and the cabin let's talk coffee! For the weekend I brought up some Oslo Coffee Company beans. Lately, I've been really enjoying beans with notes of chocolate. I was intrigued by the Thor House Blend beans for it's notes of bittersweet chocolate, plum and raw sugar. The coffee was great!


It's hard to tell in this picture, but the coffee bubbles in the top glass part of the pot. It's kinda cool to watch as it's being brewed. 






Coffee with homemade zucchini bread for breakfast. Yum!



It's nice to be surrounded by trees and snow in Vermont. New York hasn't seen much snow this winter. I enjoyed getting out of the city and breathing the fresh air, even if it was raining too hard to go skiing on our last day. Here is the beautiful view from the house.



Went we stayed at the house for the first time last year I was a bit worried about the coffee situation. In planning for the trip it never crossed my mind to worry about packing a coffee pot or not. Coffee pots are pretty essential and standard in kitchens. I was more worried about if I brought enough coffee for myself and to share with the eight other people on the trip. It turned out I brought the right amount of coffee to survive the weekend (it was close at the end). The real issue was learning how to use this old coffee pot!



From the outside it doesn't look that scary or weird, but then it has all of these parts! Personally, I like using a clear glass coffee pot so that I can measure how much water is in the pot. This coffee maker does not have any measurements to gauge how much water is in it. Ya just have to eyeball it! After guesstimating the water measurement I had to remember how the whole thing fit back together, guess how much ground coffee beans to put in it, and brew the coffee. It was lucky it all worked out. Coffee to water ratios are not my specialty (particularly without having the measuring spoon for coffee beans or measuring the water).

This year, I was confident I had enough coffee beans, but debated bringing a french press. The coffee pot ended up working last year, but it felt more like luck then knowledge and skill. I debated bringing an alternate brewing method to ensure it was brewed correctly. In the end I decided part of the adventure of the trip was using the funky coffee pot to make coffee in the morning, and with nine adults on the trip the coffee would get sorted just fine. In the end, I didn't actually brew one pot of coffee! Every morning I missed brewing coffee by a few minutes- someone was always up and about in the kitchen before me. I feel like as a big coffee drinker I should be the one making the coffee, but honestly I was relieved not to have to deal with the coffee pot.



Look at all of those pieces!







Okemo has converted to using these electronic card tickets for ski lifts. They are really quite cool. Instead of having a ticket hanging from your coat or ski pants this card can be read from inside your coat pocket. You just walk up to the gate and lean towards the card reader (it looks kind of like a metal detector), it reads the card, and lets you through. Pretty nifty!

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